Flow - Throughput, Mixing, etc.

The behavior of fluids at the microscale level can differ significantly from the everyday behavior of fluids that we are accustomed to.  Factors, such as surface tension and viscosity, start to dominate the physics of microfluidic channels, while gravity plays a negligible role.

Milliliter, Microliters, Pa, psi and other units commonly used in microfluidic
Milliliter, Microliters, Pa, psi and other units commonly used in microfluidic Fluid volumes used in microfluidics are generally quite small. The most commonly used volumetric units are “milliliters” and “microliters”.
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How fast do liquids move through microfluidic channels?
Did you ever wonder “How fast do fluids move through microfluidic channels?” To answer this question, we collected some experimental…
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Microfluidic design: Minimizing Internal Volumes
Microfluidic design: Minimizing Internal Volumes Each component of a microfluidic system (tubing, connector, microfluidic channel, etc.) has an internal volume.  This volume has to be…
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Modeling flow rates in microfluidic channels
Did you ever wonder “How fast do fluids move through microfluidic channels?” To answer this question, we collected some experimental…
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Microfluidics and Mixing - Introduction
Microfluidics and Mixing - Introduction Some of the physical phenomena that we frequently encounter in our daily life do not play a significant role, nor…
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Microfluidics Mixing Using Ridges & Chevrons
Microfluidics Mixing Using Ridges & Chevrons Mixing liquids in microfluidic channels is difficult and typically requires using chips specifically optimized for this purpose
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